FAQ

 Where can I find more information about the study and what’s involved?

Contact us and we can provide you with further information. Details of the study are also available from the website of our funders: http://www.nets.nihr.ac.uk/projects/hta/086801

 

Where is the study happening?

Primary Care sites, hospitals and community settings in London

 

Who has said it is OK to do this study in the UK?

The study has been reviewed and approved by a research ethics committee on behalf of the NHS

 

Who is paying for the study?

The study is fully funded by the Department of Health through the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme

 

 

 

 

 

Information

Information about tuberculosis (TB), how it can be caught, what symptoms there are and what should be done if you think you or someone else has TB can be found here. These websites also contain information about TB in population of the UK, Europe and the world and what is being done to try to reduce the number of people affected by TB.

World Health Organisation (WHO) TB website - Information about the disease, symptoms and treatment from a global perspective.

http://www.who.int/topics/tuberculosis/en/

NHS TB website - Information about the disease, symptoms and treatment from a UK perspective.

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Tuberculosis/Pages/Introduction.aspx

PHE TB website - Information about the disease, treatment and epidemiology in the UK.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tuberculosis-and-other-mycobacterial-diseases-diagnosis-screening-management-and-data

NICE report 2006 “Preventing and treating tuberculosis Understanding NICE guidance – information for people who have tuberculosis or are being tested for it, their families and carers, and the public”

http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/pdf/CG033publicinfo.pdf

Meningitis Trust (UK based charity) - Information on TB meningitis

http://www.meningitis-trust.org/TB.html

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)  - FRAMEWORK ACTION PLAN TO FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/publications/Publications/0803_SPR_TB_Action_plan.pdf 

NHS Immunisations leaflet entitled -

Tuberculosis, TB is on the increase – make sure you know the facts

http://www.immunisation.nhs.uk/files/TB_leaflet.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Vaccination against TB

 

 

 

There is a vaccine against TB, commonly called BCG which refers to the strain of the bacteria it is made from, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin. These websites contain information about the BCG vaccine, how it works and who it is given to.

 

 

 

NHS Immunisations leaflet entitled -

Tuberculosis  – the disease, its treatment and prevention

http://www.immunisation.nhs.uk/publications/269367_tb-1.pdf

Immunisation Against Infectious Disease 1996 – "The Green Book": Tuberculosis Chapter (August 2006)

 

www.dh.gov.uk/prod_consum_dh/groups/dh_digitalassets/documents/digitalasset/dh_104934.pdf

Department of Health, frequently asked questions about BCG vaccination

http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publichealth/Communicablediseases/Tuberculosis/Tuberculosisgeneralinformation/DH_4125886

World Health Organisation (WHO) – information on currently used BCG vaccination

http://www.who.int/vaccine_research/diseases/tb/vaccine_development/bcg/en/

 

 

 

 

 

homepage

 

Welcome to the UK PREDICT TB Study homepage

Description: rint

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the website for the PREDICT study, which will look at the tests that are available for diagnosing people with tuberculosis, TB. This study is funded by the NHS NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programmeand coordinated by the Health Protection Agency.

 

TB is a disease which can take a long time to develop after a person is infected with the bacteria. The time between infection and becoming ill with symptoms of TB is called the latent period. During the latent period, some people manage to beat the infection and do not go on to have symptoms, but other people do go on to become ill. The tests that we have at the moment are not able to tell us who will become ill and who won’t. In this study we will be looking at some new tests that may help to do this so that we don’t treat people who will stay well, especially because some of the TB treatments have some side effects.

 

We have recruited over 10,000 people who have been in contact with someone who has active TB, or people who have recently moved to the UK (in the last five years) living in London. The full information about the study is in the study leaflet and flowcharts which you can download. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Governance

The study has been approved by the Brent Ethics Committee. It has also been approved for inclusion into the UKCRC portfolio. The conduct of the study is governed through an independent study steering committee and a data monitoring committee appointed by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment.

 

Study Steering Committee

Prof Bertie Squire, Consultant Infectious Disease Physician, University of Liverpool – Chair

Dr Sani Aliyu, Consultant in Infectious Disease and Microbiology, Addenbrooke’s University Hospital

Dr Stuart Baugh, Consultant Respiratory Physician, Goole Hospital

Prof Ibrahim Abubakar, Study Chief Investigator

Observers: Prof Francis Drobniewski, Prof Ajit Lalvani, Prof Jon Deeks

 

Data Monitoring Committee

Dr Ann Chapman, Consultant in Infectious Diseases (Chair)

Dr John Innes, Retired Consultant Chest Physician

Observer: Prof Jon Deeks

 

 

 

The UK Prognostic Study of the Interferon Gamma Release Assay for Tuberculosis (PREDICT)

Welcome to the website for the PREDICT study, which will look at the tests that are available for diagnosing people with tuberculosis, TB. This study is funded by the NIHR HTA Programme and coordinated by Public Health England.  We are working in NHS sites, clinics, GP surgeries and community settings to investigate prognostic value of tests for latent tuberculosis infection.

TB is a disease which can take a long time to develop after a person is infected with the bacteria. The time between infection and becoming ill with symptoms of TB is called the latent period. During the latent period, some people manage to beat the infection and do not go on to have symptoms, but other people do go on to become ill. The tests that we have at the moment are not able to tell us who will become ill and who won’t. In this study we will be looking at some new tests that may help to do this so that we don’t treat people who will stay well, especially because some of the TB treatments have some side effects.

We have now completed the study. Our results will be published soon in the Lancet Infectious Diseases and in the NIHR HTA journal.

 

Our academic partners include

University College London

Imperial College

University of Birmingham

Queen Mary University of London

Brunel University